Liberty State Park

Restoration of the Interior of Liberty State Park

A bill recently introduced in the New Jersey State Legislature will seek to protect Jersey City’s Liberty State Park from inappropriate privatization and commercial development plans.

“The Liberty State Park Protection Act” seeks to preserve open space at Liberty State Park (LSP) in perpetuity and to protect it against the relentless assaults of inappropriate privatization and commercial development schemes that have plagued this great, free American public commons since it opened in 1976.

The park encompasses more than 1,200 acres–approximately 600 acres of land and 600 acres of water–and contains significant natural, historic, recreational, scenic, and cultural resources. It is a priceless New Jersey and American urban oasis in the middle of densely populated metropolitan northern New Jersey.

More than 5 million people of all ethnicities, religions and cultures visit the park each year to enjoy free outdoor activities together, natural areas, the Nature Center and the historic CRRNJ Terminal with its immigration and transportation history.

The purpose of the Liberty State Park Protection Act is to preserve open space at Liberty State Park (LSP) in perpetuity and to protect it against the relentless assaults of inappropriate privatization and commercial development plans schemes that have plagued this great, free American public commons since it opened in 1976.

The bill also respects LSP’s 42-year history of sustained public opposition by caring citizens, putting democracy into action in statewide grassroots battles against privatization and in support of a free and green park.

Protection measures in the bill ensure that the future of Liberty State Park will be guided by a democratic and transparent public participation process in park decision-making and planning The bill also reinstates and revises an LSP Advisory Committee of park stewards and engages the public and the Committee in the review of any proposals or plans including the mandated creation of a management plan by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection to help guide the park’s future. The Act’s provisions leave open the possibility of “small scale, park-appropriate privatization plans,” which would be subject to public review.

How to Help

Submit a Letter to the Editor at The Jersey Journal.The email address is  jjle[email protected]