Coastal Restoration Program Update

August 10, 2022

Our oyster babies have attached to the oyster castles and have made their way to their permanent home at the Naval Weapons Station Earle living shoreline. The castles are installed using vessels and SCUBA, hand placing the castles on the bay bottom. The Team also completed the first fish trap deployment in July. To study habitat value of the living shoreline, fish traps are left to soak for 48 hours. All species are identified and then released. We saw something new this round, a Cusk Eel! We also deployed the first round of sediment traps. Sediment traps are installed at the living shoreline and provide us with data on how much accretion is in and around the oyster castles at the living shoreline – valuable information for determining the efficacy of resilience projects. We also monitored the SOAR oysters that were planted last year from G.E.I Oyster Farm in the Great Egg Harbor Inlet. These oysters are huge and beautiful and are hopefully be reproducing, adding more oysters to the Raritan Bay system. Lastly, we worked with Central Regional High School’s hockey team to put together oyster reef structures made from donated hockey sticks. Check out the article here! 

July 21, 2022

It’s been a very busy few weeks for the Coastal Restoration team at Naval Weapons Station Earle!

The oyster spat have set on the oyster castles and are enjoying their time in the tanks. Soon they will make their way to their permanent home at the NWSE living shoreline. We saw lots of interesting critters during our first fish trap deployment. To study habitat value of the living shoreline, fish traps are left to soak for 48 hours.
All species are identified and then released. We saw something new this round, a Cusk Eel! We also deployed the first round of sediment traps. Sediment traps are installed at the living shoreline and provide us with data on how much accretion is in and around the oyster castles at the living shoreline – valuable information for determining the efficacy of resilience projects.
We also monitored the SOAR oysters that were planted last year from G.E.I Oyster Farm in the Great Egg Harbor Inlet. These oysters are huge and beautiful and will hopefully be reproducing this season.